Prostrate Bead-Grass

Prostrate_Bead-Grass_jpgThe Poaceae family is commonly called the grass family.  This genus (Paspalum) has 42 species in the United States and about 250 species worldwide.  These grasses are most abundant in warm regions and in the United States are most plentiful in the Southeast. The name of this genus (Paspalum) is from the Greek paspale meaning “meal” and likely refers to the seeds which are eaten by wildlife. Bead Grasses are named for the seeds found along one side of the stem.  These plants grow in dry or moist areas.  These grasses provide food for upland gamebirds and other birds.

OtherCommonName:

Slender Papalum

ScientificName:

Paspalum setaceum var. psammophilum

Community:

Thicket

PlantStatus:

Native

LifeSpan:

Perennial

PlantHeight:

Prostrate to 3 feet

FruitingTime:

Mid July to October

Distribution:

New Hampshire to Florida ~ Coastal plain in New Jersey ~ Mexico and West Indies Island

FloweringTime:

Early July to October

IdentifyingCharacteristics:

Prostrate to erect, hairy or smooth ~ Leaves narrow, mostly near base ~ Blades soft, deep green ~ Spikelet tufted, usually paired, elliptic to oval forming 2-rowed or 4-rowed seeds along one side of stem ~ Short knotty rhizomes