New York Aster

New York AsterThis large family (Asteraceae), commonly called the Aster Family, consists of 1,314 genera and 21,000 species of herbs, shrubs, climbers and a few trees is found chiefly in temperate and subtropical regions.  The plants are of value to man as ornamentals; a few are insecticides and fish poisons. The family (Asteraceae) is named from the Greek aster meaning “star” and refers to the radiate heads of the flowers.  This family was called the starwort family.  This species name (novi-belgii ) means “of Belgium” or “New Netherlands”; the early name for New York.  The common name (New York Aster) is derived from the scientific name. New York Asters grow in moist, open ground of meadows, shaded woods edges and salt marsh edges.  The common double-flowered garden asters belong to a different genus (Callistephus). Though abundant in many places, asters have relatively little importance to wildlife. A few birds and small mammals eat the leaves and seeds.

OtherCommonName:

ScientificName:

Aster novi-belgii

Community:

Thicket

PlantStatus:

Native

LifeSpan:

Perennial

PlantHeight:

2 to 5 feet

FruitingTime:

Late September to early November

Distribution:

Newfoundland to Florida ~ Statewide in New Jersey

FloweringTime:

Late August to late October

IdentifyingCharacteristics:

Stems sometimes with lines of hairs from leaf base and sometimes smooth ~ Leaves narrow, lance shaped, simple, entire or weakly toothed, alternate ~ Flowers violet or blue disk, daisy-like in heads, 20 to 50 ray flowers