Mouse-Ear Chickweed

Mouse-ear_Chickweed_jpgThis family (Caryophyllaceae) commonly called the Pink or Carnation Family consists of 89 genera and 2,070 species of herbs, shrubs and a few trees found in temperate and warm climates.  Latin caryophlum means “a clove” alluding to the clove-like scent to some carnations. The genus Cerastium is named from the Greek cerastesmeaning “horned”, alluding to the shape of the slender and often curved capsule or fruit.Mouse-Ear Chickweed is edible.  The tender leaves can be added to salad but are best boiled and served as a cooked green. Mouse-Ear Chickweed is found along roadsides, in fields, lawns, and waste places.  It is a common weed in many habitats.

OtherCommonName:

Common Mouse-Ear Chickweed

ScientificName:

Cerastium vulgatum

Community:

Edge

PlantStatus:

Naturalized from Eurasia

LifeSpan:

Short Lived Perennial

PlantHeight:

Prostrate or Erect 6 to 20 inches

FruitingTime:

May to June

Distribution:

Most of North America ~ Statewide in New Jersey, infrequent in Pine Barrens

FloweringTime:

Early April to November, Most late April and May

IdentifyingCharacteristics:

Stem slender, sticky-hairy ~ Flower small on long stalk, terminal in groups, petals deeply notched ~ Leaves opposite, small, oval (resemble mouse ears)