Japanese Sedge

Japanese_Sedge_jpgThe origins of Japanese Sedge are questionable, though it is believed that it was accidentally introduced in 1929, either from the wreck of a Japanese ship or from routine dumping of a ship’s ballast.  It grew quickly along the New Jersey coast, with growth habits similar to American Beach Grass.  Japanese Sedge however, appears more resistant to disease and human traffic. Like American Beach Grass, Japanese Sedge is an effective anchor for the primary dune sand.  It occupies a similar habitat in northeast Asia and is healthiest in areas with high rates of sand movement.  Transported by ocean waves, Japanese Sedge is now found from Massachusetts to Virginia.  It was greatly dispersed during the March of 1962. This plant is extremely invasive and is overtaking many areas that were originally covered by American Beach Grass.  It is considered one of the “ten most unwanted plants” in New Jersey.  As with other invasive plants, it is destructive by limiting the number of plant species within a plant community.

OtherCommonName:

ScientificName:

Carex kobomugi

Community:

Primary Dune

PlantStatus:

Non-native

LifeSpan:

Perennial

PlantHeight:

Four to twelve inches

FruitingTime:

Late July to September

Distribution:

Massachusetts to Virginia

FloweringTime:

June to September

IdentifyingCharacteristics:

Stiff, curling, yellow-green leaves with stout stems