Hairy Hawkweed

Hairy HawkweedThis large family (Asteraceae), commonly called the Aster Family, consists of 1,314 genera and 21,000 species of herbs, shrubs, climbers and a few trees is found chiefly in temperate and subtropical regions.  The plants are of value to man as ornamentals; a few are insecticides and fish poisons. Early Greeks reported that hawks ate the plant to sharpen their eyesight, thus the name “Hawkweed”. Ancient people used plants in this genus to treat stomach aliments and applied a preparation to the skin for inflammations.  The root was reported to help the bite of a scorpion, if applied to the puncture.In 1663, physicians prepared a decoction (medicine prepared by boiling the thick parts of the plant; ingested hot or cold) to enhance healing of  “green” wounds. The plant was also prepared as wine and given to the wounded patient.

OtherCommonName:

Hawk Plant

ScientificName:

Hieracium floribundum

Community:

Edge

PlantStatus:

Native

LifeSpan:

Perennial

PlantHeight:

1 to 5 feet

FruitingTime:

August to October

Distribution:

Masschcuttes to Florida ~ In NJ found throughout the Coastal Plains

FloweringTime:

Early July to Late September

IdentifyingCharacteristics:

Stems are hairy, solitary conspicuously spreading toward the base. Leaves star-shaped, narrow toward the top