English Ivy

 

English Ivy

The Araliaceae family commonly called the Ginseng family consists of 57 genera and 800 species of shrubs, lianas, trees and a few herbs.  The Araliaceae family is found chiefly in tropical and subtropical regions.  Plants in this genus (Hedera) are a source of pith from which “rice paper” is obtained. The name Ginseng is derived from the Chinese fen-shen (manlike), referring to the branching root. English Ivy flowers late and is pollinated by wasps, moths and similar creatures.  A very nutritious fruit ripens over the winter and is an important food source for nesting birds in the Spring. Young twigs are a source of dye.  In earlier times plants in this genus (Hedera) were used to corns and were considered to counteract the effects of alcohol.  These plants were often used on signs for a tavern.

OtherCommonName:

ScientificName:

Hedera helix

Community:

Edge

PlantStatus:

Naturalized from Eurasia

LifeSpan:

Woody vine

PlantHeight:

Spreading to 25 feet long

FruitingTime:

July to Augus

Distribution:

Found in numerous New Jersey counties ~ Grows on ground and climbs trees and buildings

FloweringTime:

June

IdentifyingCharacteristics:

Leaves evergreen, alternate, dark green, shiny, palmately 3-5 lobed ~ Flowers small, green ~ Fruit black berry-like drupe